GDPR

GDPR-Ireland

Every business uses technology to survive and thrive, and that’s why GDPR has relevance for most businesses. For any businessman, entrepreneur, enterprise IT leader, or IT consultant, GDPR is as urgent as it is critical. However, it’s pretty much like the Y2K problem in the fact that everybody is talking about it, without really knowing much about it.

Most companies are finding it hard to understand the implications of GDPR, and what they need to do to be compliant. Now, all businesses handle customer data, and that makes them subject to Data Protection Act (DPA) regulations. If your business already complies with DPA, the good news is that you already have the most important bases covered. Of course, you will need to understand GDPR and make sure you cover the missing bases and stay safe, secure, reliable, and compliant in the data game. Here are 10 things businesses need to do to be ready for GDPR.

Top 10 things that organizations should do to prepare and comply with GDPR

 

1.Learn, gain awareness

It is important to ensure that key people and decision makers in your organization are well aware that the prevailing law is going to change to GDPR. A thorough impact analysis needs to be done for this, and any areas that can cause compliance issues under GDPR needs to be identified. It would be appropriate to start off by examining the risk register at your organization if one exists. GDPR implementation can have significant implications in terms of resources, particularly at complex and large organizations. Compliance could be a difficult ask if preparations are left until the last minute.

 

2.Analyze information in hand

It is necessary to document what personal data is being held on hand, what was the source of the data, and who is it being shared with. It may be necessary for you to organize an organization-wide information audit. In some cases, you may only need to conduct an audit of specific business areas.

As per GDPR, there is a requirement to maintain records of all your activities related to data processing. The GDPR comes ready for a networked scenario. For instance, if you have shared incorrect personal data with another organization, you are required to inform the other organization about this so that it may fix its own records. This automatically requires you to know the personal data held by you, the source of the data and who it is being shared with. GDPR’s accountability principle requires organizations to be able to demonstrate their compliance with the principles of data protection imposed by the regulation.

 

3. Privacy notices

It is important to review the privacy notices currently in place and put in a plan for making any required changes before GDPR implementation. When personal data is being collected, you currently need to provide specific sets of information such as information pertaining to your identity and how you propose to use that information. This is generally done with a privacy notice.

The GDPR requires you to provide some additional information in your privacy notices. This includes information such as the exact provision in the law that permits asking for that data and retention periods for the data. You are also required to specifically list that people have a right to complain to the ICO if they believe there is a problem with the way their data is being handled. The GDPR requires the information to be provided in the notices in easy to understand, concise and clear language.

 

4. Individual rights

You should review your procedures to confirm that they cover all the individual rights set forth in the GDPR. These are the rights provided by the GDPR.

 

  • To be informed
  • Of access
  • To rectification
  • To erasure
  • To restrict processing
  • To data portability
  • To object
  • To not be subject to automated profiling and other such decision-making

This is an excellent time to review your procedures and ensure that you will be able to handle various types of user requests related to their rights. The right to data portability is new with the GDPR. It applies:

 

  • To personal data provided by an individual;
  • When processing is based on individual consent or to perform a contract; and
  • Where processing is being done by automated methods.

 

5. Requests for Subject access

You would need to plan how to handle requests in a manner compliant with the new rules. Wherever needed, your procedures will need to be updated.

  • In most of the cases, you will not be allowed to charge people for complying with a request
  • Instead of the current period of 40 days, you will have only a month to execute compliance
  • You are permitted to charge for or refuse requests which are apparently excessive or unfounded
  • If a request is refused, you are required to mention the reason to the individual. You are also required to inform them that they have the right to judicial remedy and also to complain to the correct supervising authority. This has to be done, at the very latest, within a month.

 

6. Consent

It is important to review how you record, seek and manage consent and if any changes are required. If they don’t meet the GDPR standard, existing consents need to be refreshed. Consent must be specific, freely given, informed, and not ambiguous. A positive opt-in is required and consent cannot be implied by inactivity, pre-ticked boxes or silence. The consent section has to be separated from the rest of the terms and conditions. Simple methods need to be provided for individuals to take back consent. The consent is to be verifiable. It is not required that the existing DPA consent have to be refreshed as you prepare for GDPR.

7. Aspects related to children

It would be good if you start considering whether systems need to be put in place in order verify the ages of individuals and to get consent from parents or guardians for carrying out any data processing activity. GDPR brings in specific consent requirements for the personal data of children. If your company provides online services to children, you may need a guardian or parent’s consent so as to lawfully process the children’s personal data. As per GDPR, the minimum age at which a child can give her consent to this sort of processing is set to 16. In the UK, this may be lowered to 13.

 

8. Aspects related to data breaches

You should ensure that you have the correct procedures necessary to investigate, report, and detect any breaches of personal data. The GDPR imposes a duty on all companies to report specific types of data breaches to the ICO, and in some situations, to individuals. ICO has to be notified of a breach if it is likely to impinge on the freedoms and rights of individuals such as damage to reputation, discrimination, financial loss, and loss of confidentiality. In most cases, you will also have to inform the concerned parties directly. Any failure to report a breach can cause a fine to be imposed apart from a fine for the breach by itself.

 

9. Requirements related to privacy by design

The GDPR turns privacy by design into a concrete legal requirement under the umbrella of “data protection by design and by default.” In some situations, it also makes “Privacy Impact Assessments” into a mandatory requirement. The regulation defines Privacy Impact Assessments as “Data Protection Impact Assessments.”’ A DPIA is required whenever data processing has the potential to pose a high level of risk to individuals such as when:

 

  • New technology is being put in place
  • A profiling action is happening that can significantly affect people
  • Processing is happening on a large set of data

 

10. Data protection officers

A specific individual needs to be designated to hold responsibility for data protection compliance. You must designate a data protection officer if:

  • You are a public authority (courts acting in normal capacity exempted)
  • You are an institution that carries out regular monitoring of individuals at scale
  • You are an institution that performs large-scale processing of special categories of data such as health records or criminal convictions

Many of GDPR’s important principles are the same as those defined in DPA; still, there are significant updates that companies will need to do in order to be on the right side of GDPR.